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VOBSTER QUAY INLAND DIVING & SWIMMING CENTRE
VOBSTER QUAY
3D MODELS COURTESY OF MARCUS BLATCHFORD & SIMON BROWN
3D MODELS COURTESY OF
MARCUS BLATCHFORD
& SIMON BROWN
SURFACE WATER TEMP:  10.8 °C    UPDATED:  02-12-2021
SURFACE WATER TEMP:  10.8 °C
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DIVE ATTRACTION
Hawker Siddeley HS-748
Photos copyright © Jason Brown
Finning past the Crushing Works at a depth of 12m, you could be forgiven for questioning your eyesight as a most unexpected sight comes into view. Lying in three sections in a line, you'll find the wreck of a Hawker Siddley HS-748 aircraft.
Donated to Vobster Quay by Exeter Airport, the HS-748 - registration G-AVXJ - was a 58-seat twin prop aircraft that served with the Civil Aviation Authority carrying out flight calibration duties until the late 1990s. G-AVXJ was delivered in September 1969 to the Civil Aviation Flying Unit for airways calibration. Registered to Flight Precision when calibration duties were transferred to them in 1996, the aircraft was later sold to Emerald Airways in 1998.

After retirement, the aircraft remained in storage at Exeter before eventually makings its way to Vobster Quay in 2004. Cut into three sections, what remained of the aircraft was dropped into the lake near the Crushing Works with the invaluable assistance of the Royal Engineers of the British Army.
Hawker Siddeley HS-748
INFORMATION FOR DIVERS
For visitors to the 9 and 6 metre training platforms, the front section of the aircraft provides a pleasant and interesting detour for trainee and visiting divers alike. Don't forget to have a quick peek into the cockpit and you'll see many of the aircraft's controls still in place!
The aircraft wreck offers divers of all experience levels an exciting diving opportunity that's not to be missed. Even if you're not a big fan of sunken metal, the tail section nearest the Crushing Works is not to be missed due to its popularity with the local fish population - it's often so filled with fish that it's difficult to see past them!

For those with overhead training, all sections of the wreck provide considerable potential for penetration - you can swim through all three sections of the fuselage exploring the banks of aviation equipment still in position. Whilst we don't recommend that newly-qualified divers enter the tail and cockpit sections, everyone can enjoy finning through the wide open centre section.

Laying at a depth of between 12 and 14 metres, as well within reach of divers of all levels. Feeling even more adventurous? A PADI Wreck Diver Specialty will give you the skills and knowledge to safely explore the impressive interior of this exciting attraction.
Essential Information
Buoy #
11, 16 & 17
Location
Minimum Depth
12 metres
Maximum Depth
14 metres
Best Bits
Cockpit controls
Tail section racks
Fish life around wreck
Hazards
Protruding metal
Overhead environment
Loss of visibility
Entanglement
SAFETY FIRST: Only experienced divers with overhead environment training should enter the cockpit and tail section of this dive attraction. Movement inside is restricted and the cold, darkness and depth can be very disorientating. If in doubt, DO NOT ENTER!
Photo copyright © Paul Seymour
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