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VOBSTER QUAY INLAND DIVING & SWIMMING CENTRE
VOBSTER QUAY
3D MODELS COURTESY OF MARCUS BLATCHFORD & SIMON BROWN
3D MODELS COURTESY OF
MARCUS BLATCHFORD
& SIMON BROWN
SURFACE WATER TEMP:  10.8 °C    UPDATED:  02-12-2021
SURFACE WATER TEMP:  10.8 °C
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DIVE ATTRACTION
ARMOURED PERSONNEL CARRIER
Photos copyright © Jason Brown
Explore a little piece of Britain's military history with a dive on our very own British Army FV432 APC. Manufactured by GKN Sankey, the FV432 was the armoured personnel carrier (APC) variant of the British Army's FV430 series of armoured fighting vehicles which are still in service today.
Since its introduction in the 1960s, the GKN Sankey FV432 armoured personnel carrier has been used for transporting infantry on the battlefield. In the 1980s, almost 2,500 vehicles were in use, with around 1500 now remaining in operation - mostly in supporting arms rather than front-line infantry service. Seeing service in both Afghanistan and Iraq, the FV432 weighed 15 tonnes and was 5.25 metres in length. Protection for the crew of two and a maximum compliment of ten soldiers was provided by 12.7mm of thick armour whilst a pintle-mounted 7.62mm L7 machine gun gave the FV432 some defence.

Most of the fixtures and fittings have been removed from our APC so it is pretty much just the shell - even the tracks have been removed. It's still very recogniseable as an ex-military vehicle, though, so it's well worth a visit...
ARMOURED PERSONNEL CARRIER
INFORMATION FOR DIVERS
Vobster's FV432 certainly won't be rushing into battle again as it now lies submerged at a depth of approximately 24 metres, making it a popular visit for more advanced divers.
What remains of our British Army Armoured Personnel Carrier is the all-steel shell with all the various hatches and doors removed to allow relatively safe penetration. Regardless, it's still pretty cramped in there so we'd strong recommend you don't go squeezing yourself into the APC any further than the main passenger compartment. If in doubt, take a peek in through the rear door and leave the penetration to the hardcore wreck divers with the prerequisite training and experience to explore in safety. Either way, exploration of this attraction benefits from a good torch as it can get very dark down there!

If you really do want to nose around inside the APC, the safest way to do it is to peer in through the large, round opening in the top. Shaped like a turrent mount, this opening provides divers with a very convenient entry and exit point should you wish to drop in and swim back out via the large entry point at the rear.

Whilst it's beyond the depth of Open Water divers, we're hoping it's presence will provide new divers with an incentive to further their training - we'd recommend a PADI Advanced Open Water as a minimum level. Feeling even more adventurous? A PADI Wreck Diver Specialty will give you the skills and knowledge to safely explore the impressive interior of this exciting attraction.
Essential Information
Buoy #
24
Location
Minimum Depth
22 metres
Maximum Depth
24 metres
Best Bits
Easy penetration
It's ex-Military!
Hazards
Protruding metal
Overhead environment
Loss of visibility
Restricted spaces
Depth
SAFETY FIRST: Only experienced divers with overhead environment training should enter this dive attraction. Movement inside is restricted and the cold, darkness and depth can be very disorientating. If in doubt, DO NOT ENTER!
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